Hot! TreeHouse is Education for Tomorrow’s Workforce

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Your parents are going to kill me for writing this. Your grandparents are going to call this anathema. So, I’ll whisper it. Ready? Here it is: don’t go to college.

Read it again… the computer still hasn’t blown up. Things have remained pretty much the same as they did the moment before you read those very words, “don’t go to college.” That’s the point with “revolutionary” ideas – they just take time to consider. They are only dangerous if you aren’t able to think for yourself.

new project manager

Maybe biting my nails will help!

Historically speaking, it was a wise choice for your parents to encourage you to go to college to start a profitable, enjoyable, and fulfilling career. In many cases, it is still required. You must go to a college or university if you want to be a doctor, teacher, attorney, or dentist. What you may not realize fully is that you do not have to go to prepare yourself for the workforce of tomorrow or to retool after you’ve lost your job during the most recent recession in the United States.

Going to College Costs Too Much

The average cost of a college education in the United States has become untenable for most. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics:

For the 2009–10 academic year, annual prices for undergraduate tuition, room, and board were estimated to be $12,804 at public institutions and $32,184 at private institutions. Between 1999–2000 and 2009–10, prices for undergraduate tuition, room, and board at public institutions rose 37 percent, and prices at private institutions rose 25 percent, after adjustment for inflation.

How can a college student afford to pay over $50,000 on an education at a public university? The simple answer is that they can’t. The trend that we are seeing now in the United States, post-mortgage backed securities defaults, is student loan defaults. Here are some startling facts from the US Education Department:

The U.S. Department of Education today released the official FY 2009 national student loan cohort default rate, which has risen to 8.8 percent, up from 7.0 percent in FY 2008. The cohort default rates increased for all sectors: from 6.0 percent to 7.2 percent for public institutions, from 4.0 percent to 4.6 percent for private institutions, and from 11.6 percent to 15 percent at for-profit schools.

There is nothing indicating that this trend will change any time soon. The cost of education will continue to rise, and the job market will likely continue to be stagnate. So, while going back to school, or attending college as a traditional high school grad, was immediately touted as the most likely course for prosperity through the “Great Recession” in the US, it will saddle you with unimaginable debt. Talk about getting started on the wrong foot!

The Higher Salary Fiction

USA Today recently captured the touted two options with which the general public is faced: college indebtedness or lower wage jobs. That’s the choice we offer young people today. It’s so widely recited, enjoined, and chorused, it has become universally accepted as truth. But is that a fair assessment of the reality we face? Are college graduates paid better? I don’t know; I defy anyone from really ever being able to determine that since the majority of college graduates end up working in fields entirely unrelated to what they went to school to learn. Similarly, it does depend on the industry. It also depends on whether you can EVEN GET A JOB after school.

Shake The Leaves, Kick the Tires

There is a bright alternative available. Treehouse has emerged as the leading online school for “business 2.0.” They teach web design, iOs and web development to the “uninitiated.” If you want to work in the field of technology, Treehouse can teach you what you need to achieve your dreams. And, it’s affordable. They don’t saddle you with debt. Instead, they focus on teaching you skills you need to succeed in the workforce of tomorrow.

Treehouse offers a 100% Satisfaction Guarantee so that if you’re not pleased with your membership, you can drop it within a month. Unlike traditional colleges and institutions, Treehouse business and web development does not lock you in. That’s because Treehouse is not a traditional “school” – they are a group of professional internet technology professionals who know what you need to know to be successful. You can leave whenever you have enough knowledge to achieve what you would like to set out to do. They take the slogan “no more teachers, no more books… ” very seriously.

For almost the same cost as your monthly cable television bill, you will have access to over 750 highly professional tutorial videos, group forums, and a network of entrepreneurs and business leaders. Tutorials last less than 10 minutes at max, and experts are constantly adding “tuts” as technology evolves so that you remain on the bleeding edge of the industry.

No Tests. Period.

Instead of tests and exams, you’ll face interactive “code challenges” to help you determine for yourself where you are and what you’ve learned. Instead of grades, you will earn “badges” that demonstrate your proficiency. You determine what you would like to learn based on what you think about what you’d like to do. There are no predetermined paths in professions you don’t want to pursue – there are only choices between “good” and “good.”

And, it costs less than 4% of what it would cost for you to attend a four year university (based on average of $51,000 for four years). The choice is simple. Visit TeamTreehouse.com to get started today.

Author

Matt Visaggio

Matt is a go-getter and night-owl. Married with a little girl, he enjoys spending time with his family and sleeping in (or at least remembering what it was like….) Matt formerly worked in the public sector and earned his Master's degree in Public Administration. He is an avid reader and spends his time pouring over technology trends and marketing solutions for small business. He is a geek at heart and lives to learn and teach.

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